Father

Years ago, a friend told me he had a hard time thinking of God as “father” because his own father had been so abusive.

I have no such problem. I loved and greatly admired my father. Over time, I came to see his weaknesses; but these flaws could not obscure the fact that we loved each other.

Yet there are many people who were hurt by their fathers and have a hard time loving God for that reason.

As I write those words, I think of another friend whose father abandoned his family when my friend was in his early teens. It seems to have coloured his view of God whom he sees as a judge but not as a loving father. He cannot grasp the fact that Jesus died for him because God loves him so much he wants an eternal relationship with him.

These views are so widespread in society today that whole ministries have been created to help people understand the “father-heart” of God.

I have been meditating on God as my father recently. What does it mean to be a son of the Most High God?

For one thing, it means that my heavenly father sacrificed everything that was most precious to him so that I might become his son. He sent Jesus to die for me and my sins. He did this so that the great obstacle to becoming his son would be cleared away.

That shows how keen God the Father was to have me as his son.

It means, too, that I will never be fatherless. God will not abandon me. He will always be with me – even after my physical death. As the apostle Paul says in Romans 8:38, nothing can separate me from the love of God.

Also, as my father, God is there to guide me when I need guidance – and I need it daily. Like an earthly father counseling a small child, he knows my needs better than I do.

And he is my provider, arranging things so that I have enough to keep alive.

Of course, many people do not see this.

You have to live as a child of God to understand.

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2 comments so far

  1. Andrew Douglas on

    Amazing. Of course, I’m lucky to have a great father too.

  2. Robert Douglas on

    And I’m lucky to have a son like you.


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