From the mouths of babes

There is something wonderfully uncomplicated and effective in the faith of little children.

Unlike adults, little children don’t wrestle with fine theological points.  Once they believe in Jesus, they know he loves them and they trust him to do what he says he will do.

I have been thinking about this as our church – like many others – plans this summer’s kids’ camp.

Teaching children about Jesus is one of the most important activities in the kingdom of God.

Jesus placed a high priority on childlike faith.

In Mark 10, the disciples try to discourage parents from bringing their children to Jesus for his blessing.  But Jesus is indignant.  He says:

“Let the children come to me.  Don’t stop them!  For the Kingdom of God belongs to those who are like these children.  I tell you the truth, anyone who doesn’t receive the Kingdom of God like a child will never enter it.”

In fact, children can lead adults into God’s family.

I know of a case where a father started on the road to faith because his sons were involved in church activities.  He was intrigued by their faith.

Children often pray with strong faith.

It can be startling for a Christian parent when a child suggests praying when a small family problem crops up.

In fact, Paul E. Miller, author of A Praying Life, recommends that we approach prayer like a child.

“Don’t try to get the prayer right,” says Miller.  “Just tell God where you are and what’s on your mind.  That’s what little children do.  They come as they are, runny noses and all.”

David was brutally honest with God in the psalms he wrote.

He let it all out – anger, disappointment, and joy.

But David had another great quality of children – he realized he was dependent.  He depended on God.

David consulted God in prayer because he knew he would not be where he was without the Lord.

He could see God in his spirit.  And he was overwhelmed by what he saw.

May we be in awe of God like that – trusting him to lead us and care for us.

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